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British Army 1945 WWW 'Dirty Dozen' Watch
British Army 1945 WWW 'Dirty Dozen' Watch
British Army 1945 WWW 'Dirty Dozen' Watch
British Army 1945 WWW 'Dirty Dozen' Watch
British Army 1945 WWW 'Dirty Dozen' Watch
British Army 1945 WWW 'Dirty Dozen' Watch
British Army 1945 WWW 'Dirty Dozen' Watch
British Army 1945 WWW 'Dirty Dozen' Watch
British Army 1945 WWW 'Dirty Dozen' Watch
British Army 1945 WWW 'Dirty Dozen' Watch
British Army 1945 WWW 'Dirty Dozen' Watch
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British Army 1945 WWW 'Dirty Dozen' Watch

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Back in 1944 the British War Office was looking for a timepiece to replace the ATP (Army Trade Pattern) watches that had been in use since 1939. The new watch would be more suited for military use, with a waterproof case, black dial and enlarged face to allow for easier reading. The specification, known as WWW (wrist watch waterproof), was given to 12 Swiss watch manufacturers who each delivered a number of watches based on their manufacturing capacity. The resulting set of 12 watches has become know as the 'Dirty Dozen'.

Whilst these watches were ordered during WW2, many would be used long after the war by the British Army, and unfortunately the REME (Royal Electrical and Mechanic Engineers) responsible for the their maintenance and upkeep were not as interested in maintaining originality as we are today. The dial itself is a rarer MOD replacement variant that would have been installed by the REME to remove the pesky radium used  as lume on many WW2 watches. More importantly, the case and caseback still have have matching serial numbers (550), many of these pairings having becoming mixed up during servicing. 

This is a great example from Record, today a rather unknown brand that was founded in 1903 in the town of Tramelan very close to Switzerland's north western border with France. Known at the time for their exceptional movements, Record would be acquired by Longines in 1961. The movement itself is manual wind, and seems to last well for 24 hours, it'll just need a wind every morning if you plan to wear this regularly.

Condition

This is in amazing working condition, having recently been serviced. I've timed it against a digital clock of 72 hours and it's approx +8s per day, which as anyone who collects vintage watches will tell you is pretty spectacular. The case itself is in used but good condition, no issues at all, and the crystal is clean and clear. The caseback does have a couple of scratches from opening/closing, and someone has scratched in a reverse broad arrow. All together a very good, accurate and very affordable example of these in demand watches that will only appreciate in value. Comes supplied with a brand new OD nato strap and box.

Size 

  • 35.5mm (without crown)